Å Read ô The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton Ö pamyatnik.pro

Å Read ô The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton Ö There s actually little mirth in this story that ends in tragedy I read this after enjoying the author s Ethan Frome and realizing again what a good writer Edith Wharton is Lily Bart belong to the jet set of the early 1900 s She hangs out in New York mansions, Newport and the Riviera As did the author Lily was from a wealthy family that spent down its fortune and then her parents died Now she s looking for a husband with money She had some opportunities to marry earlier but she finds she s waited a bit long she s 29 now and has to consider pompous, milksop 40 year old mama s boys, and even someone who might ultimately decide to do her the honor of boring her for life Another is a portentous little ass Without a mother she doesn t have anyone to play the field for her and li First Published In , The House of Mirth Shocked The New York Society It So Deftly Chronicles, Portraying The Moral, Social And Economic Restraints On A Woman Who Dared To Claim The Privileges Of Marriage Without Assuming The ResponsibilitiesLily Bart, Beautiful, Witty And Sophisticated, Is Accepted By Old Money And Courted By The Growing Tribe Of Nouveaux Riches But As She Nears Thirty, Her Foothold Becomes Precarious A Poor Girl With Expensive Tastes, She Needs A Husband To Preserve Her Social Standing, And To Maintain Her In The Luxury She Has Come To Expect Whilst Many Have Sought Her, Something Fastidiousness Or Integrity Prevents Her From Making A Suitable Match What a piece of artIs our Lily BartSurrounded by men who don t need much urgin Yet Lily is a 29 year old virginShe s a part of a truly disgusting society the filthy rich of New York, 1905 all they do is party till five in the morning and have discreet affairs and play bridge for money and get waited on hand and foot snap your fingers once for a Faberge egg on toast, twice for a new hat made of ptarmigan feathers and rush off to Monaco and gamble and party and have affairs and snap their fingers for a new hat made of tigers eyelashes and oversee charitable foundations to help the limbless and get huffy if the gold plates of leftover anteater brains aren t cleared away quick enough.
First they all love Lily Bart because she s tall and lovely and says the right thing to everybody But clearly she hasn t said enough of the right things or she d already have Poor, lovely Lily BartHer tragic storywill break your heartShe runs in the best circles Wears the right clothesAnd flirts with rich menBut everyone knowsThat she needs to marrySomeone and fast At 29 her looks won t lastShe s ringing up debtsBorrowing from menAnd displeasing their wivesNot to mention her friend Lawrence Selden, a lawyer but not very rich It s Gilded Age New York And life s a bitch If you re not old money Like the Trenors, DorsetsAnd that odd Percy GryceThe most you can do is play very nice Like Sam Rosedale, the BrysThe Gormers and such,Who buy their way in i.
e.
, never go dutch Just remember this cliqueWho summer in Newport and vacate in FranceCan shut you out of the social danceWhich brings me back to Lily BartWho s clea There s actually little mirth in this story that ends in tragedy I read this after enjoying the author s Ethan Frome and realizing again what a good writer Edith Wharton is Lily Bart belong to the jet set of the early 1900 s She hangs out in New York mansions, Newport and the Riviera As did the author Lily was from a wealthy family that spent down its fortune and then her parents died Now she s looking for a husband with money She had some opportunities to marry earlier but she finds she s waited a bit long she s 29 now and has to consider pompous, milksop 40 year old mama s boys, and even someone who might ultimately decide to do her the honor of boring her for life Another is a portentous little ass Without a mother she doesn t have anyone to play the field for her and li On occasions like this, I rue the absence of atragedyshelf or some variation of the same because meremelancholiaseems too modest, too equivocal a word to convey the kind of heartbreak Lily Bart s story inflicted on me.
It is, perhaps, apposite that I came to this with my mind still fresh from Anita Desai s stirring homage to a resolutely single, unsung fictional heroine who holds together a disintegrating family, unacknowledged, misunderstood, left behind and forgotten Clear Light of Day Because Desai s Bim and Wharton s Lily are both flawed figures who manage to stand erect, weathering storms of hostile circumstances that whittle down their will to live and sense of self worth Even when the vicissitudes of fate leave them psychologically battered and dying inside, they manage to maintain their slippery grip on idea On occasions like this, I rue the absence of atragedyshelf or some variation of the same because meremelancholiaseems too modest, too equivocal a word to convey the kind of heartbreak Lily Bart s story inflicted on me.
It is, perhaps, apposite that I came to this with my mind still fresh from Anita Desai s stirring homage to a resolutely single, unsung fictional heroine who holds together a disintegrating family, unacknowledged, misunderstood, left behind and forgotten Clear Light of Day Because Desai s Bim and Wharton s Lily are both flawed figures who manage to stand erect, weathering storms of hostile circumstances that whittle down their will to live and sense of self worth Even when the vicissitudes of fate leave them psychologically battered and dying inside, they manage to maintain their slippery grip on idea Lily Bart, the protagonist of Edith Wharton s stunning first novel, is introduced to the reader as a young woman traveling within high society While her blood and wealth may place her on the fringe of that society, her pale beauty as it is continuously characterized throughout the novel elevates her within its ranks Lily is marriage material And within Manhattan s high society at the turn of the century, women are meant to marry and in order to marry women are meant to maintain a reputation of pale innocence indeed, they must.
Lily hesitates to question these two fundamental rules that bind her, save on rare occasion in conversation with Lawrence Selden, the man it seems she would marry if the choice were hers, and Lily Bart, born poor but from a blue blood family, grew up privileged, well her mother pretended they had wealth, always telling her hard working husband, she will not live like a pig He succumbs to an early grave, broke, at the turn of the century 20th , that is, the mother spends money, they haven t got, going to Europe, buying expensive clothes, jewelry, furniture, all for the sake of appearances, their friends, in High Society are very well to do Since childhood, Lily is told one thing, never trained for anything else, her object in life, marry a rich man, restore the family honor, love doesn t matter, the only important concern, Gold When her mother dies too, in poverty, discouraged, Lily is alone at the age of 19 Aunt Peniston, affluent, widowed sister, of Lily s father, surprisingly takes her in, she keeps mostly to herself Edith Wharton sets the New York social stage of the early twentieth century for a succession of short scenes that glitter with glossy superficiality Lightning, backdrops and lush costumes are put on display to create a natural effect in this tableaux vivant of a novel, where Lily Bart stands out as the most stunning living painting ever She is the leading actress of this theatrical narrative, a delicate flower bred for exhibition and ornament whose beauty shines with the precise effortless grace and charm that will enable her to achieve her goals Being an orphaned, single woman of twenty nine with frugal tastes Lily knows that in the gilded cage in which she blossoms and withers the only path to success is to become a saleable commodity that some wealthy gentleman will buy into ma The House of Mirth just might be to The Age of Innocence what Tom Sawyer is to Huck Finn that is, only but a stepping stone towards aprofound greatness although why I used that Twain analogy is a mystery even to me I find that brand of American Lit a bit overrated Age of Innocence is stupendous utterly amazing On the other hand, The House of Mirth describes the downward spiral of one, Miss Lily Bart, misunderstood by her social set, her particular New York niche Her story is a tragedy as deep as Jude the Obscure s her plight is both melancholic devastating New York has always been a perfect place in which to achieve some sort of victimhood Another attribute the story is severely overwritten I say attribute because that is precisely Mrs Wharton s style you read beautiful sentences, Reading Edith Wharton s second novel The House of Mirth was like being kidnapped by Barbary pirates and held for ransom for ten fortnights not a comfort, but an adventure Published in 1905, this tale of Miss Lily Bart a young woman held prisoner by New York high society for her grace and beauty until her dependence on wealthy patrons makes her vulnerable to their whims carried me off against my will and held me with jeweled prose, breathless detail to character and droll wit Wharton s milieu was alien to me and her writing often so intricate that I wanted to run home to John Steinbeck, but now that the experience is over, find myself changed by it.
Book I begins in a nation with places to go and people to see, or Grand Central Station to be exact Bachelor attorney Lawrence Selden returns to New York from the count I have read almost all of Edith Wharton s writing I have the highest regard for her work She was overshadowed by Fitzgerald and Hemingway in her day but even so she won the Pulitzer prize in 1921 for her novel The Age of Innocence The House of Mirth was one of her early novels and my favorite, although I like all of her novels.
Lily Bart, the protagonist in The House of Mirth, is such a captivating and tragic figure that she has stayed in my mind for years Of course, creating great characters was one of Wharton s wonderful gifts.
For those readers that have not discovered Edith Wharton, give her a try The House of Mirth would be perfect to start with.
What a piece of artIs our Lily BartSurrounded by men who don t need much urgin Yet Lily is a 29 year old virginShe s a part of a truly disgusting society the filthy rich of New York, 1905 all they do is party till five in the morning and have discreet affairs and play bridge for money and get waited on hand and foot snap your fingers once for a Faberge egg on toast, twice for a new hat made of ptarmigan feathers and rush off to Monaco and gamble and party and have affairs and snap their fingers for a new hat made of tigers eyelashes and oversee charitable foundations to help the limbless and get huffy if the gold plates of leftover anteater brains aren t cleared away quick enough.
First they all love Lily Bart because she s tall and lovely and says the right thing to everybody But clearly she hasn t said enough of the right things or she d already have

Edith Wharton

Å Read ô The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton Ö pamyatnik.pro Edith Newbold Jones was born into such wealth and privilege that her family inspired the phrase keeping up with the Joneses The youngest of three children, Edith spent her early years touring Europe with her parents and, upon the family s return to the United States, enjoyed a privileged childhood in New York and Newport, Rhode Island Edith s creativity and talent soon became obvious By the a